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  5. The Brazilian Coffee Cycle: From Flowering to Harvesting
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  5. The Brazilian Coffee Cycle: From Flowering to Harvesting
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  5. The Brazilian Coffee Cycle: From Flowering to Harvesting

The Brazilian Coffee Cycle: From Flowering to Harvesting

by Nov 29, 2023Coffee0 comments

If your business revolves around the international coffee market, understanding the coffee production cycle in Brazil is fundamental to ensuring the quality and consistency of your product. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the stages of this cycle, from flowering to the processing of the beans. Check it out!

Flowering: The Start of a Cycle

The coffee cycle in Brazil begins with flowering, which usually takes place between September and November, depending on the region and the type of coffee grown.

The coffee bloom plays a fundamental role as an indicator of the crop’s productivity. When flowering is abundant and occurs evenly, there is a greater chance of a generous crop. On the other hand, irregular flowering, with few flowers or problems with pollination, can result in a crop with low productivity.

After pollination, the flowers give rise to small green fruits, signaling the start of the coffee journey.

You can find out about the whole flowering process in this article.

Post-Flowering: Bean Formation and Critical Development

The post-flowering phase is when the fruit begins to develop, marking a critical period for grain formation. Factors such as temperature, rainfall and plant nutrition have a direct impact on the characteristics of the grains, such as screen size and sensory profiles. This is a time when the producer’s expertise stands out, as careful handling directly influences the quality of the final product.

At this stage, some producers adopt careful approaches, ranging from sustainable soil management to the use of technologies such as drones and sensors. Constant monitoring of the development of the beans, using techniques such as these, allows for more assertive adjustments in management, contributing to obtaining higher quality coffees at harvest.

The Harvest Challenge

At the peak of the beans’ ripeness comes the harvest period, which usually takes place between May and September, varying according to the region and the type of coffee grown.

There are two main approaches to harvesting coffee in Brazil: mechanized and manual. Mechanized harvesting involves the use of harvesting machines that can be equipped with ripeness sensors, allowing for the automatic selection of ripe beans. Manual harvesting, on the other hand, although more laborious, is favored in mountainous areas and in plantations that prioritize quality, as it allows for a more careful selection of the fruit. The choice between these methods often depends on the topography of the land and the emphasis on product quality.

The harvest phase in Brazil not only defines the quality of the coffee, but also has a direct influence on the New York Stock Exchange. Producers, investors and international buyers are paying close attention to the unfolding of this crucial phase, adjusting their strategies according to the dynamics of the coffee market on the New York Stock Exchange.

Post-harvest and Processing

Finally, the coffee producer’s attention turns to the post-harvest phase, a critical stage that requires specific care in the processing of the beans, starting with the immediate processing of the harvested beans. At this stage, there are various ways of carrying it out, such as different forms of processing and drying (natural, hulled, semi-washed, washed).

After processing, the grains are taken to the classification stage, where a sample will be tasted and classified according to the sensory notes found in that batch. From this point on, the highest quality grains are separated from the rest, allowing specific batches to be offered to more demanding markets. In addition, proper storage is essential to prevent the coffee from degrading over time.

Patience is a virtue during the post-harvest period, as the next phase, flowering, is a process that responds to the rhythm of nature. The time between harvest and flowering varies, but generally takes between 2 and 3 months. During this period, producers pay attention to weather conditions, soil management and plant health to ensure a robust return to the production cycle, and so a new cycle begins.

Conclusion

For large international industries and coffee buyers, understanding the coffee cycle in Brazil provides a competitive advantage. By understanding the nuances of the process, it is possible to make more informed choices and establish strategic partnerships with suppliers who excel at producing high-quality coffee.

In short, the Brazilian coffee cycle is a journey that results in unique coffee profiles. As the beans are formed and harvested with precision, Brazilian producers contribute to the global supply of this beverage loved by much of the world.

Read more:

Coffee Flowering Season: a crucial moment for productivity

Learn all about coffee flowering stage and how it directly impacts on crop’s productivity: Read more.

Mutua Project: Results from the first group of coffee growers

Check out the results from the first group of coffee growers of the Project Mutua – Forests and Springs, an Atlantica Coffee initiative to boost sustainability and positive impact coffee growing. Click here to read.

*This article aims only to provide information about the impacts of weather, based on internal and public sources, valid at the time of its dissemination. It does not aim to guide recipients in making any decisions, which are therefore solely the responsibility of the recipient. Atlantica Coffee is exempt from any liability arising from direct or indirect losses.